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Information about herbs and their properties as well as parts used, typical Preparations and precautions

  A - D      /     E - K      /     L - Q      /      R - Z

CLICK ON EACH HERB TO VIEW INFORMATION

A
Acacia
Agrimony
Alfalfa
Aloe
Angelica Root
Anise
Annatto Seed
Arnica Flower
Artichoke Leaf
Ashwagandha Root
Astragalus Root

B
Balm Of Gilead Buds
Barberry
Barley Grass
Bayberry
BeeBalm
Beet Root
Bilberry
Birch Bark

Black Cohosh
Black Haw
Blackberry
Bladderwrack
Blessed Thistle Herb
Blood Root
Blue Cohosh
Blue Flag Root

Blue Vervain
Blue Violet Leaf
Boldo Leaf
Boneset Herb
Borage Herb
Buchu Leaf
Buckthorn Bark
Bugleweed
Bupleurum Root
Burdock Root
Butchers Broom Root
Butternut Bark
C
Calamus Root
Calendula Flowers
California Poppy Herb
Caraway Seed
Cascara Sagrada Bark
Cat's Claw
Catnip Leaf
Celery Seed
Centaury Herb
Chamomile
Chaparral Leaf
Chaste Tree Berries
Chia Seed
Chickweed Herb
Chicory Root
Chili & Cayenne
Chlorella
Chrysanthemum Flower
Cleavers Herb
Cloves
Club Moss
Coltsfoot Leaf
Comfrey
Coriander
Couchgrass Root
Cramp Bark
Cranberry
Cranesbill Root
Cumin
Curry

D
Dandelion
Devil's Claw Root
Devil's Club Root Bark
Dill Weed
Dong Quai Root
Dulse




 Acacia and Gum Arabic Powder
Also known as- Acacia senegal (acacia gum or true gum arabic), Acacia nilotica (Indian gum arabic), and Acacia seyhal (talha).

Parts Used
The gum.

Uses
Soluble fiber that dissolves in water and forms a gel-like substance in the intestines. It has been noted to suppress appetite, help alleviate constipation and diarrhea. and support weight loss efforts (by helping you stay full for longer. When taken by mouth to reduce cholesterol levels and to help increase weight loss. Sometimes frequently used acacia gums in water or sugar syrup to treat sore throat, laryngitis, diarrhea, and urinary tract infections. As a paste,acacia gum in water can be used as an herbal bandage for scalds and burns.Acacia gum is sometimes used in ice cream. As a medicine, the gum is used lozenges and to stabilize emulsions. It is also used to make a medium for applying essential oils, balsams, etc.

Precautions
Safe for internal use as a food and for external use without limitation, although allergies are possible for people exposed to windborne pollen (in Africa, India, or Saudi Arabia).


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 Agrimony Herb
Also known as- Agrimonia eupatoria L. and/or Agrimonia procera, common agrimony, church steeples, cocklebur, philantopos, and sticklewort.

Uses
Helps relieve diarrhea. Soothes sores , it also helps with colic, a breath freshener and also helps relieve coughs and asthma..
Good for sore throats. Sometimes prescribed for fevers.. It can be used externally for skin sores.

Precautions
There are no contraindications for use of up to 3 grams per day. Taking more than this amount for treating sore throat could aggravate constipation if it exists.


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 Alfalfa Leaf and Herb
Also known as- Medicago sativa, lucerne, holy-hay, and trefoil.

Parts Used
Seeds, sprouts, and the aboveground parts of the plant as a bulk herb, for teas, and in capsules.

 

Uses
is commonly used for arthritis, digestive problems, as a diuretic and for reducing high cholesterol. .

Precautions
DO NOT USE if pregnant and nursing due to their content of stachydrine and homostachydrine which may cause miscarriage. The Seeds should not be eaten as they contain high levels of toxic amino acid canavanine. They contain high levels of the toxic amino acid canavanine.


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 Aloe Powder
Also known as- Aloe vera is the herb typically found in home herb gardens and Aloe barbadensis (Curacao aloe) the species in the herb trade in the United States. Europeans use Aloe barbadensis, Aloe capensis, (Cape aloe), and Aloe ferox for laxative preparations.

Uses
Used to treat minor burns, sun burn, cuts, scrapes and poison ivy. Also a good moisturizer the skin. Many people use it to Helps reduce acne and treat other skin problems.

Precautions
Aloe gel is an extraordinarily safe herb. Internally it is not recommended while nursing or pregnant and it is a bulk forming laxative and adequate fluids must be taken. Not recommended for long term use.


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 Angelica Root and Powder
Also known as- Angelica archangelica, Garden Angelica, Great Angelica, and Wild Parsnip.

Uses
helps to treat boils, and furuncles, relieving swollen gums.Helps relieve flatulence, and gastrointestinal spasms, and to treat the pain of hacking cough, menstrual cramps. and urinary tract infections. Helps with digestive disorders and problems with blood circulation.

Precautions
Avoid excessive exposure to sunlight if using angelica oil. Do not take angelica and eat celeriac (celery root) as a vegetable if you tend to sunburn. The safety of angelica for pregnant women and nursing mothers has not been established and its use is not recommended.


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 Anise Seed and Powder
Also known as- Pimpinella anisum

Sold in the United States and Canada as anis. In India, Indonesia, and Iran, anise and fennel are used interchangeably in cooking and are referred to by the same name. In the Philippines, the term "anise" refers the herb known in the United States as star anise.

Uses
Can help relieve congestion from allergies, colds, or flu, upset stomach with gas.Acts as very mild stimulant. Angelica tea is often used to treat PMS as well.

Precautions
Allergies are possible, but rare. Not recommended while pregnant or nursing.


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 Annato
Also known as- Bixa orellana, achiote, annata, beninoki, jarak belanda, kam tia, kangaram, kesumba, latka, roucou, sa ti, yan zhi shu, and yin ju shyu in various speciality markets.

Uses
Used to promote healthy digestion , strengthen bones, helps lower fevers , relieves headaches , reduce nausea, and protect respiratory distress.

Precautions
Sensitivities to all food colorants, including annatto, may occur if there is also sensitivity to BHA, BHT, and artificial red and yellow dyes.


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 Arnica Flower
Also known as- Arnica montana L. or A. chamissonis, leopardÍs bane and mountain tobacco.

Uses
Helps treat sprains, bruises, and muscle pain and helps to soothe sore feet. It possesses anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-septic properties. Helps improve circulation .Can also help with seasickness.

Precautions
Not for internal use. Do not apply to broken skin. Not recommended while pregnant or nursing.


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 Ashwaganda
Also known as- Withania somnifera , Indian Ginseng, Avarada, Withania, and Ashwaghanda.

Uses
Helps relieve stress and fatigue. and stress-induced discomfort and strengthen the immune system. Anti-inflamitory

Precautions
Not recommended for pregnant women. Not for use for long periods of time.


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 Astragalus Root
Also known as- Astragalus membranaceus, milk vetch, huang qi (Chinese), ogi (Japanese), and hwanggi (Korean).

Uses
To treat upper respiratory infections as well as the common cold by helping boost the immune system. Also to help treat excessive sweating, ulcers and diarrhea.

Precautions
Astragalus is non-toxic in any dosages.


       B
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 Balm of Gilead (Poplar Buds)
Also known as- Populus balsamifera, Populus spp , Populus trichocarpa and poplar buds.

Uses
Antibacterial and anti-inflammatory, creams containing Balm of Gilead buds are used to treat frostbite, sunburn, superficial injuries of the skin, and external hemorrhoids. It relieves pain, especially the pain from sore muscles and arthritis..  It reduces swelling and inflammation. 

Precautions
If you are highly allergic to aspirin, you may be mildly allergic to Balm of Gilead buds. Recommended for external use only.


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 Barberry Root
Also known as- Berberis vulgaris

Uses
Helps relieve infections of ears, nose, throat, and sinuses. Also used to relieve psoriasis, helps stabilize blood pressure and to normalize heart rhythms.a

Precautions
Not to be used for long periods of time especially with children. Not recommended while pregnant or nursing.


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 Barley Grass
Also known as- Hordeum vulgare, green grass, mai ya in Chinese markets. The term mai ya could refer to either barley or wheat grass, but barley is preferred to wheat in traditional Chinese medicine. Gu ya, or rice shoots, are eaten as a food rather than taken as a medicine.

Uses
The ancients used barley grass to treat galactorrhea, that is, excessive or untimely lactation. In modern complementary medicine, barley grass is appropriate whenever diet fails to provide a full range of nutrients. Research published as recently as September 2005 notes that one of the principal growth factors in the barley shoot is melatonin. This finding may explain the calming effect of the herb.

Precautions
Barley grass may stop lactation in nursing mothers. Not recommended while nursing or pregnant.


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 Bayberry
Also known as- Myrica cerifera, wild cinnamon, Candleberry, Myrica, Myrica cerifera, Myrica pensylvanica, Southern Bayberry, Southern Wax Myrtle, Tallow Shrub, Vegetable Tallow, Waxberry. Not to be confused with barberry.

Uses
Helps support of the digestive system and respiratory system inflammation and infection in the mouth, gums, and throat, and stimulant, induces coughs to help release phlegm. Bayberry may help to manage menstrual symptoms such as excessive bleeding

Precautions
For occasional use only. Since bayberry can stimulate uterine contractions, avoid during pregnancy. If you are allergic to bayberry wax, use with caution.


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 Bee Balm
Also known as Wild Bergamot , Scarlet Monarda, Oswego Tea, Bergamot, Horsebalm

Uses
Used as an antiseptic, helps with stomach and intestinal gas, diuretic , helps increase perspiration, and stimulant to help reduce fatigue and stress. A good treatment of colds, inflammation of mucous membranes of the head and throat , headaches, and gastric disorders. Can help reduce low fevers, nausea and menstrual pain.

Precautions
Do NOT use if you're pregnant or nursing. Take caution if you have thyroid issues.


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 Beet Root
Also known as- Beta vulgaris

Uses
Rich in nutrients, vitamins and minerals . Helps with liver and kidneys disorders. and helps prevent the accumulation of fatty tissues in the liver. Helps lower cholesterol.

Precautions
None. Maximum safe dosages for young children, pregnant or nursing mothers, or those with severe liver or kidney disease have not been established, but there are no reports of any side effects from the use of the product.


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 Bilberry
Also known as- Vaccinium myrtillus, European blueberry, Airelle, Bilberry Fruit, Bilberry Leaf, Black Whortles, Bleaberry, Blueberry, Burren Myrtle, Dwarf Bilberry, Dyeberry, Huckleberry, Hurtleberry, Myrtilli Fructus, Trackleberry, Whortleberry, Wineberry.

Uses
Helps improve circulation problems and swelling in the lower legs and ankles. Helps with eyesight due to issues caused by diabetes or high blood pressure by strengthening the walls of the blood vessels in the eye, reduces inflammation,
The effect of bilberry on night vision is most consistent in people who have poor night vision.

Precautions
Has been known to be safe for pregnant women. Seek advice from a physician or herbalist for dosages for nursing mothers, young children, or people with severe liver or kidney disease. Not recommended for long term use.


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 Birch Bark
Also known as- Betula spp, Betula, Betulae Folium, Betula Pendula, Betula Verrucosa, Downy Birch, Silver Birch, White Birch.

Uses
Antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory, birch bark has been used to treat skin outbreak. Also to relieve joint pain associated with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or gout.

Precautions
Birch is diuretic. Do take caution if you are unable to use diuretics..


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 Birch Leaf
Also known as Betula spp. Betula alba, Alnus acuminata, Betula pubescens (White Birch; Spanish: Alamo Blanco, Abedul; Nahuatl: Aylin, Tepeylin)

Uses
Helps relieve bladder and kidney infections by acting as a diuretic to help reduce fluid retention and swellings, ahtough NOT to be used with other diuretic medicines or herbs.Can help aid digestion and acts as a mild stimulant and anti-inflamatory

Precautions
Not be used for edema or issues with kidney function. Don't use birch leaf if you are already taking another diuretic, especially if you are taking Lasix (furosemide).


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 Black Cohosh Root
Also known as- Cimicifuga racemosa, Actaea Macrotys, Actaea Racemosa, Baneberry, Black Snakeroot, Bugbane, Bugwort, Cimicifuga, Cimicifuga Racemosa, Phytoestrogen, Rattle Root, Rattle Snakeroot, Rattlesnake Root, Rattleweed, Squawroot. Do not confuse with the potentially toxic blue cohosh.

Uses
Black cohosh is a popular remedy for hot flashes, mood swings, and vaginal dryness of menopause and help reduce the severity of premenopausal and menopausal symptoms.

Precautions
sust be AVOIDED during pregnancy as it can stimulate uterine contractions which may cause miscarriage. Not advised for use when breastfeeding.


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 Black Haw Bark
Also known as- Viburnum prunifolium. American sloe, stagbush, Southern Black Haw, Stag Bush, Viburnum, Viburnum lentago, Viburnum rufidulum.

Uses
Antispasomodic, analgesic, astringent, sedative, cardiac tonic, uterine and muscle relaxant, nervine, diuretic. Can help relieve menstrual cramps and false labor pains. May also help lower blood pressure and for treating asthma.

Precautions
Black haw is safe in pregnancy, and may even prevent miscarriage. NOT recommended if you have liver and/or kidney problems. May cause gastrointestinal upset. Large doses is not recomended.


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 Blackberry Leaf
Also known as- Rubus fruticosus, Black Berry, Bramble, Dewberry, Goutberry, Rubi Fruticosi Folium, Rubi Fruticosi Radix, Rubus affinis, Rubus plicatus, Thimbleberry.

Uses
Helpful for soothing sore throats and helps strengthen the immune system. Useful for treating intestinal gas and mild diarrhea. Also useful for use for skin rashes

Precautions
None.


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 Blackberry Root
Also known as- Rubus fruticosus, Black Berry, Bramble, Dewberry, Goutberry, Rubi Fruticosi Folium, Rubi Fruticosi Radix, Rubus affinis, Rubus plicatus, Thimbleberry.

Uses
Blackberry root is used to treat diarrhea, for which it is considered more effective than blackberry leaf.

Precautions
Avoid excessive use (more than three times a day). People with sensitive stomachs who take consume too many fluids with tannins (of any origin, even coffee or tea) can experience stomach upset.


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 Bladderwrack
Also known as- Fucus vesiculosus, Kelp, Ascophyllum nodosum, Black Tang, Bladder Fucus, Bladder Wrack, Blasentang, Cutweed, Fucus, Kelpware, Kelp-Ware, Knotted Wrack, Marine Oak, Meereiche, Quercus Marina, Rockweed, Rockwrack, Schweintang, Seawrack, Tang, Varech.

Uses
Helps treat thyroid disorders. Contains many nutrients good for bones and joints which makes it good for arthritic issues by reducing inflamation. Also good for digestion and gas along with minor constipation.

Precautions
NOT to be used while pregnant. NOT for daily use or for more than 2 weeks at a time..


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 Blessed Thistle
Also known as- Cnicus benedictus, Carbenia benedicta, Cardo Santo, Carduus, Carduus benedictus, Cnici Benedicti Herba, Cnicus, Holy Thistle, Spotted Thistle, St. Benedict Thistle.

Uses
Used to help stimulate appetite and aids in digestive issues caused by insufficient secretion of stomach acid. helpful for upset stomach, and gas. Also acts as an antibacterial. Helps aid in respiratory ailments, gas and constipation.

Precautions
Generally not recommended during pregnancy. If you are allergic to artichokes, avoid this herb.


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 Blood Root
Also known as- Sanguinaria Canadensis, Indian paint, and Paucon.

Uses
Used as an expectorant for bronchitis and for asthma. Is also a diuretic. Take caution if you can't take diuretics or are already taking one. Can be used topically to remove skin tags.
DO NOT apply blood root to your eyelids, lips, nose, or genitals. Blood root can damage healthy skin tissue.

Precautions
Avoid during pregnancy. If you suspect melanoma, it MUST be treated by a physician.
Blood root is used mostly for external use.


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 Blue Cohosh
Also known as- Caulophylum thalictroides, blue ginseng, yellow ginseng, papoose root, squawroot. Not to be confused with black cohosht.

Uses
Blue cohosh stimulates uterine activity which can help induce labor if you are overdue. Also has been used as an analgesic, and has been known to be more effective than aspirin.

Precautions
Blue cohosh is a useful herb that should be used with care. Not to be taking daily or on long term basis.
To induce labor, blue cohosh should only be administered by an experienced midwife.
Not for use for infants and not recomended for children. Do not use if there is high blood pressure or heart disease.


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 Blue Flag Root
Also known as- Iris versicolor, Wild Iris, Flag Lily, Liver Lily, Snake Lily, Fleur-de-lis, Dragon Lily, Poison Flag, Dagger Flower, Dragon Flower, Water Flag, Water Iris and Larger Blue Flag.

Uses
Once officially listed in the U.S. Pharmacopeia, blue flag has been used medicinally for centuries to detoxify the body and treat sluggish liver action. Taken internally as a tea, it is a strong laxative, diuretic and emetic. Dried root is milder than fresh root, and it's recommended that dried root be used for infusions and teas. Applied topically, it may reduce inflammation, relieve pain and inhibit infection in bruised, swollen or injured joints.

Precautions
Blue flag root should not be used by pregnant or lactating women. Some people may have allergic skin reactions to blue flag root, and the fresh root may cause nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. It should not be taken by children.


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 Blue Violet Leaf and Herb
Also known as- Viola odorata, Banafshah, Garden Violet, Neelapushpa, Neelapuspha, Sweet Violet Herb, English Violet, Violeta, Sweet Violet Root, Violae Odoratae Rhizoma, Herba, Violet.

Uses
The whole plant is anti-inflammatory, diaphoretic, diuretic, emollient, expectorant, and laxative. It is taken internally in the treatment of bronchitis, respiratory catarrh, coughs, and asthma. Externally, it is typically used to treat mouth and throat infections. The plant can either be used fresh, or dried, and some reports suggest the dried material is much stronger in regards to its laxative qualities.
The flowers are demulcent and emollient and are used in the treatment of biliousness and lung troubles. The petals are made into a syrup and used in the treatment of infantile disorders.

Precautions
None.


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 Boldo Herb
Also known as- Peumus boldus, Boldea fragrans, Boldine, Boldoak Boldea, Boldo Folium, Boldus, Boldus Boldus, Peumus fragrans.

Uses
Boldo leaves are used to treat bladder and urinary tract infections, gallbladder discomfort, gallstones, heartburn, and mild stomach cramps. The herb works by encouraging the release of bile, dissolving fats, but also by increasing intestinal transit time, that is, giving the digestive tract more time to digest food. The ascaridole attacks intestinal worms.

Precautions
DonÍt use if there is severe liver disease or obstruction of the bile ducts. Seek advice from a practitioner if you have/had liver or kidney disease.


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 Boneset organic
Also known as- Eupatorium perfoliatum, por huesos, Agueweed, Hempweed, Indian Sage and Thoroughwort.

Uses
An excellent remedy for colds and congestion by raising body temperature to kill the colds virus. Also helps bring fevers down by inducing perspiration to lower body temperature.

Precautions
Boneset is most effective when taken on the first day of symptoms. Safety for pregnant women, nursing mothers, children under the age of 6, or persons with severe liver or kidney disease has not been established.


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 Borage Herb
Also known as- Borago officinalis, Beebread, Bugloss, and Star Flower.

Uses
Borage seed oil is used as an anti-inflammatory for chronic conditions, notably arthritis, but also asthma, chronic bronchitis, eczema, psoriasis, and other skin conditions.
The flower, stems, and leaves are used in diuretics to support treatment of urinary tract conditions and weak hearts as well as to support circulation to treat varicose veins. The herb, but not the seed oil, induces sweating.

Precautions
Reports that Borage seed oil contains toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids have been found to be false. However the herb, leaf and flower does and its internal use is prohibited.
Not recommneded while pregnant. Not recommended for long term use.


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 Buchu Leaf
Also known as- Barosma betulina,

Uses
Used along with other herbs for treating coughs and colds. Helps disinfect the urinary tract during urinary tract infections and inflammation of the kidneys and urinary tract and for bladder irritations. It is also used as a diuretic. Buchu is also often used to treat prostate infections.

Precautions
Buchu contains the hepatotoxin (toxic to the liver) pulegone, also known to be present in pennyroyal.


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 Buckthorn
Also known as- Rhamnus frangula, Alder Dogwood, Arrow Wood, Black Dogwood, Buckthorn, Buckthorn Bark, Dog Wood, Frangula Alnus, Frangula Bark, Frangulae Cortex, Glossy Buckthorn, Rhamnus Frangula.

Uses
The berries and seeds are great for aging skin. A good source of vitamins, antioxidants, Buckthorn bark is used as a laxitive but stimulating the intestines. If you experience cramping, you've used too much.

Precautions
You should not use buckthorn or any other laxative if you have appendicitis, CrohnÍs disease, or ulcerative colitis. Not recommended for children under 12. Not recommended while pregnant. Avoid long term use, and discontinue in the event of diarrhea or watery stools.

 Sea Buckthorn
also known as sandthorn, sallowthorn or seaberry

Uses
The leaves and flowers are used for treating arthritis, gout, and some skin rashes. Helps in healing wounds like bedsores and cuts. A good source of vitamins, antioxidants, amino acids and minerals. Helps lower blood pressure and cholesterol. Sea buckthorn oil is also a great source of omega-7s and antioxidants which help boost the immune system.

Precautions
Seek advise if you're pregnant or if you're blood pressure is below normal.


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 Bugleweed Herb
Also known as- Lycopus virginicus, Gipsyweed, Sweet Bugle, Water Horehound, and Water Bugle.

Uses
Used as an herbal medicine for treatment of overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism). Helps moderate estrogen levels, and helps relieve cyclic breast pain in women.

Precautions
DonÍt use bugleweed as a substitute for medical care for hyperthyroidism. This herb should not be used by people who do not have hyperactive thyroid. may interfere with blood glucose medication. Consult a physician if you are taking oral contraceptives


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 Bupleurum Root
Also known as- Bupleurum chinense, chai hu, thorowax root.

Uses
Helps in bringing down fevers and helps aid in chest congestion and respiratory ailments due to flu, hemorrhoids, indigestion,irritable bowel syndrome. Also used as a liver cleanse.

Precautions
No known precautions.


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 Burdock
Also known as- Arctium lappa, gobo, poor manÍs potatoes, Arctium, Arctium minus, Arctium tomentosum, Bardana, Bardana-minor, Bardanae Radix, Bardane, Beggar's Buttons, Burr Seed, Clotbur, Cocklebur, Cockle Buttons, Edible Burdock, Fox's Clote, Great Bur, Great Burdocks, Happy Major, Hardock, Harebur, Lappa, Love Leaves, Orelha-de-gigante, Personata, Philanthropium, Thorny Burr.

Uses
Stimulates the release of gastric juices and aids digestion. Used in treating acne, eczema, endometriosis, psoriasis, and uterine fibroids. Helps detoxify the liver, and balance hormones, improve skin health, reduce inflammation, and lower blood pressure.

Precautions
Safe for use as a food or herb.


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 Butchers Broom
Also known as- Ruscus aculeatus, Box Holly, Jew's Myrtle, Kneeholm, Knee Holly, Pettigree, Sweet Broom, Rusci Aculeati, Rusci Aculeati Rhizoma.

Uses
Used for hemorrhoids, gallstones, hardening of the arteries, pain, cramping and heaviness in legs due to poor blood circulation, leg swelling, varicose veins.

Precautions
Maximum safe doses for young children, pregnant or nursing women, and persons with liver or kidney disease have not been established.


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 Butternut Bark
Also known as- Juglans cinerea, Butternussbaum, Lemon Walnut, Oil Nut, White Walnut, Nogal Ceniciento, Noyer Cerdr*.

Uses
Butternut bark is a mild laxative. Also aids in the release of bile by the liver, assisting the digestion. Helps maintain hormonal balance.

Precautions
Do not use if you have gallstones.


       C
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 Calamus
Also known as- Acorus calamus, Sweet Flag, Cinnamon Sedge, Sweet Myrtle, Acorus, and Sweet Rush.

Uses
Helps with circulation and joint pain, helps relieve sore throat pain, gastrointestinal inflammation. Can also relieve skin inflammation due to rashes.

Precautions
For external use only. Its internal use as a medicinal herbal product should only be administered by someone with experience in using this botanical. The FDA strictly prohibits the use of Calamus in food products.


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 Calendula Flowers
Also known as- Calendula officinalis, pot marigold, Garden Marigold, Gold-Bloom, Holligold, Marigold, Marybud, Zergul.

Uses
Great for use in salves and creams for acne and eczema, disinfect minor wounds and to treat infections of the skin, useful in treating slow-healing cuts and cuts, can help reduce pain due to soar throat when used as a gargle.

Precautions
None.


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 California Poppy
Also known as- Eschscholzia californica, Western Poppy, Poppy, and Gold Poppy.

Uses
California poppy is most often employed to provide restful sleep without the side effects of benzodiazepine drugs such as Librium, Valium, and Xanax. Clinical studies showed that California poppy in combination with hawthorn and magnesium salts is safe, effective, and free of side effects for the treatment of mild to moderate anxiety. The advantage of California poppy is relief from tension without morning grogginess, nausea, vomiting, or constipation.

Precautions
Safety not established during pregnancy or nursing or for children under the age of 6.


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 Caraway Seed
Also known as- Carum carvi, Anis des Vosges, Apium carvi, Carvi Fructus, Cumin des Pres, Haravi, Krishan Jeeraka, Krishnajiraka, Kummel, Kummich, Roman Cumin, Semen Cumini Pratensis, Semences de Carvi, Wiesen-Feldkummel, Wild Cumin.

Uses
Caraway promotes gastric secretion and stimulates appetite. It breaks down spasms in the gastrointestinal tract to prevent flatulence, but it is also used to treat menstrual cramps and gallbladder spasms. Caraway oil is strongly fungicidal, having a stronger anti-fungal and anti-yeast activity than the prescription medication Nystatin.

Precautions
To keep the essential oils at maximum potency, store in a glass container protected from light, moisture, and heat.


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 Cascara Sagrada Bark and Powder
Also known as- Rhamnus purshiana, Bitter Bark, Buckthorn, California Buckthorn, Cascara Sagrada, Chittem Bark, Dogwood Bark, Purshiana Bark, Rhamni Purshianae Cortex, Sacred Bark, Sagrada Bark, Yellow Bark, Frangula Purshiana.

Uses
Even conventionally oriented physicians often recommend cascara sagrada to patients suffering constipation after surgery for hemorrhoids. The 1,8-dihydroxy-anthracenes in cascara sagrada act on the nerves in the intestinal tract, numbing the nerves that hold back stool and stimulating the nerves that propel stool downward. If you experience cramping, you've used too much.

Precautions
For occasional use only as it is a bulk forming laxative and should be taken with adequate fluids.
You should not use Cascara Sagrada or any other laxative if you have appendicitis, Crohn's disease, or ulcerative colitis. Not recommended for children under 12. Unlike buckthorn, cascara sagrada is not known to be safe for pregnant women and nursing mothers. 


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 Cat's Claw Bark and Powder
Also known as- Uncaria tomentosa, and Una de Gato.

Uses
The traditional application of cat's claw has been to treat rheumatoid arthritis. The herb is also used for stomach ulcers, gastritis, eczema, "break-bone fever," and liver diseases. Recent clinical studies find that the herb is useful for relieving knee pain.
Since the 1980's, cat's claw most common use in modern herbal medicine is an immune stimulant. The oxindole alkaloids in catÍs claw strengthen the immune system and also improve circulation by lowering blood pressure. The master rain forest herbalist Leslie Taylor has used cat's claw tinctures and teas to treat cancer and HIV with remarkable success.

Precautions
Women should avoid use of this herb when trying to get pregnant. It may be best to avoid use of this herb if you have any chronic health condition resulting from over-stimulation of the immune system, such as lupus, multiple sclerosis, scleroderma, or Show-gren's syndrome.


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 Catnip
Also known as- Nepeta cataria, Catmint, Catnep, Catswort, Field Balm, Menta De Gato.

Uses
Scientists have ascertained that the feline reaction to catnip is due to the its content of nepetalactone. The herb is also strongly antifungal and a bactericide for Staphylococcus aureus, as well as a close chemical relative to a number of insect repellants that affect mosquitoes and termites.

Precautions
Not recommended for use while pregnant.


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 Catuaba Bark and Powder
Also known as- Anemopegma mirandum, Erythroxylum catuaba, angelim-rosa, caramuru, cataguà, catiguà, chuchuhuasha, pau de reposta, or tatuaba.

Uses
The native peoples of the Amazon who use catuabà combine it with muira puama, allowing the mixture to stand in warm water overnight to make an amber medicinal infusion.
There is laboratory evidence that catuabà enhances male sexual performance by increasing the brainÍs sensitivity to dopamine, making the sex act more pleasurable, as well as by vasodilation, enhancing erectile strength. In 2002, a Brazilian company was awarded a patent for an HIV prevention formula based on an extract of the herb, although research is still in progress.

Precautions
None.


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 Cedar Berry
Also known as- Juniperus monosperma, One-seed Juniper, Cherrystone Juniper, Redberry Juniper, New Mexico Cedar, West Texas Juniper, and Sabina

Uses
Juniperus monospermus is a variety of juniper that grows in higher, dryer elevations in the southwest. It has traditionally been used in the same ways as the common juniper. Besides the medicinal uses listed above, juniper boughs and leaves were often burned to help purify the air, and the leaves and twigs can be used to make a green or brown dye. While there has been little formal research done to substantiate the medical claims, a number of botanical databases note that the various chemical constituents of the leaves and cedar berries do have emetic, diuretic, antibiotic, germicidal and antiseptic properties. Dr. James Duke notes that the plant has chemicals that suggest it may help the body fight arthritis, asthma, cough, congestion, hepatitis and muscle stiffness.

Precautions
Cedar berry can be toxic when taken in large amounts. It should not be used by people with kidney or urinary tract problems, or by pregnant or nursing mothers, as it causes contractions.


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 Celandine
Also known as- Chelidonium majus, Bai Qu Cai, Chelidonii, Chelidonii Herba, Greater Celandine, Schollkraut, Tetterwort, Verruguera.

Uses
Celandine is most often used for treating gallbladder problems. It stops spasms at the same time it stimulates the production of bile to flush gallstones away. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, celandine is more often used as a pain-relieving cough medication. The sap of the fresh herb is a traditional remedy for warts.

Precautions
Not recommended for use while pregnant


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 Celery Seed
Also known as- Apium graveolens, wild celery, Aches des Marais, Ajamoda, Apii Frutus, Celery Fruit, Fruit de Celeri, Smallage, Selleriefruchte, Selleriesamen.

Uses
Celery seed is a traditional remedy for nervous stomach. Prior to the Middle Ages, a wild form of celery referred to as selinon, or smallage, was used as a diuretic and a carminative, which is a treatment to reduce intestinal gas. Today, although celery is primarily used for flavor, it has the same effects on digestion.
A series of scientific studies conducted 10 to 30 years ago found that celery seedÍs essential oil contains compounds that are mildly tranquillizing and helpful in relieving arthritic pain. Some recent research suggests that celery seed contains other compounds that stop the carcinogenic effect of environmental toxins in the liver. Other research suggests that essential oils in the seeds may be mildly bactericidal against Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica.

Precautions
If you should not use diuretics, you should not use celery seed. The herb does not cause sensitivity to sunlight by itself, but it can cause increased risk of sunburn in people who take prescription ACE inhibitors to control high blood pressure.


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 Centaury Herb
Also known as - Centaurium erythrae, Bluebottle, Bluet, Cornflower, Common Centaury, Feverwort, European Centaury, Bitter Herb, Lesser Centaury, Mad Dog's Herb, Dog Bite Herb, Stand Up and Go Away, Centre Of The Sun, Centaury Gentian, Christ's ladder, Bitter Bloom, Bitter Clover, Bitter-Rose, Centory, Chironia, Fel Terrae, Steps of Christ, Thousand Golden Leaves, Wild Succory, Pharmaceutical Name: Herba Centaurii

Uses
Aromatic bitter, stomachic and tonic. It acts on the liver and kidneys, purifies the blood, and is an excellent tonic. Commonly used for gas and bloating, colic and constipation. Helps relieve heartburn and a gentle laxative. and to lose weight.
It is used in homeopathic medicine as a treatment for fevers.

Precautions
None recorded


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 Chamomile Flowers and Powder
Also known as- Matricaria recutita, Hungarian chamomile or wild chamomile, Camomilla, Camomille Allemande, Chamomile, Chamomilla recutita, Echte Kamille, Feldkamille, Fleur de Camomile, Kamillen, Kleine Kamille, Manzanilla, Matricaire, Matricaria recutita, Matricariae Flos, Pin Heads, Sweet False Chamomile, True Chamomile.

Uses
The traditional use of chamomile tea is to induce deep sleep"an effect confirmed in a study of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. Chamomile stops spasms in the smooth muscles lining the stomach and intestines, and contains chemicals that are anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral, and antiparasitic. One hint for best results: Always brew chamomile tea in a closed container, especially if you live at a high altitude.

Precautions
None.


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 Chaparral Herb
Also known as- Larrea tridentata, Creosote Bush, Gobernadora, and Hediondilla.

Uses
Chaparral contains lignans that are very similar to estrogen, giving it an effect on the skin similar to that of soy taken internally. Applied to the skin, chaparral can have a remarkable healing effect on eczema, herpes, cold sores, psoriasis, and contact dermatitis. Internal use is not recommended.

Precautions
Chaparral was once banned by the American Herbal Products Association when it was thought the herb could have caused hepatitis, but the ban was lifted when no association between the herb and the reported cases of hepatitis could be confirmed. Its long term use is not recommended and excessive use may result in stomach upset.
Special Warning: SEEK ADVICE FROM A HEALTH PRACTITIONER BEFORE USE IF YOU HAVE/MAY HAVE HAD KIDNEY OR LIVER DISEASE. DISCONTINUE USE IF NAUSEA, FEVER, FATIGUE OR JAUNDICE (DARK URINE, YELLOW DISCOLORATION OF EYES) SHOULD OCCUR:


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  (Chaste Tree) Vitex Berry and Powder
Also known as- Vitex agnus-castus, Chaste Berry, Monk's Berry, Vitex, Chastetree, Chinese Vitex, Gattilier, Hemp Tree, Monk's Pepper, Vitex, Vitex rotundifolia, Vitex trifolia, Viticis Fructus.

Uses
Chaste berry has been used for centuries to treat constipation, flatulence, and hangovers, and to bring on menstruation and lactation. In modern herbal medicine, the herb is mainly used to treat breast swelling and breast pain caused by excessive secretion of the hormone prolactin during PMS or cyclic mastalgia. The herb can lengthen the proliferative (first) phase of the menstrual cycle, and also relieve water weight, headache, and fatigue.

Precautions
Men shouldn't take chaste berry. Testicular atrophy could result after repeated use. Not recommended during pregnancy. Binging on sugar, alcohol, or marijuana will block the herb's action on dopamine receptors in the brain and cancel out its effects. Not recommended while pregnant.


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 Chia Seed
Also known as- Salvia hispanica, California Chia, California Sage, Chia Pet Seed, and Chia Sage.

Uses
Touted as being the new “superfood”, Chia seeds are high in easily digestible protein, essential fatty acids, vitamins, soluble fiber, antioxidants, minerals, and are a digestive, disinfectant, febrifuge and ophthalmic. They are currently being used for their nutritional and medicinal properties, endurance for athletes, for suppressing the appetite, weight loss, leveling blood sugar, and for aiding intestinal regularity. Chia seeds readily dissolve into the water, creating a substance that looks like gelatin. This gel-forming action is due to the soluble fiber in the Chia seed. Researchers believe that this same gel-forming phenomenon takes place in the stomach when Chia seed is consumed, thus creating a physical barrier between carbohydrates and digestive enzymes and slowing the conversion of carbohydrates into sugar. Slowing the conversion of carbohydrates into sugar helps with endurance and metabolic rates, which is beneficial for athletes and others. For weight loss, Chia seeds are an appetite suppressant, and Chia gel may be used to replace food within recipes. Bulking up a meal with Chia gel helps lessen the amount of food consumed, since Chia gel is primarily made up of water. Chia gel may also be used in place of fats within recipes, even within baked goods. Chia seed has hydrophilic properties, and can absorb more than 12 times its weigh in water. Because of this, Chia seeds can prolong hydration, helping retain moisture and regulate more efficiently the body's absorption of nutrients and body fluids, including electrolyte balance.

Precautions
There is currently no evidence of adverse effects of whole or ground Chia seeds. As with any dietary supplement consult your healthcare practitioner before using this product, especially if you are pregnant, nursing or under medical supervision.


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 Chickweed Herb
Also known as- Stellaria media, and Stellaria spp, Mouse-ear, Adder's Mouth, Tongue Grass, Alsine, Chick Wittles, Satinflower, Winter Weed, and Star Weed.

Uses
Chickweed is a "drawing herb," once thought to remove toxins from the skin, now more typically explained as a microcirculatory stimulant for the skin. Chickweed may be employed to treat acne, abscesses of the skin, and eczema, as well as duodenal and peptic ulcers.

Precautions
None.


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 Chicory Root roasted organic
Also known as- Cichorium intybus, Blue Sailors, Common Chicory, Wild Chicory, Succory, and Wild Succory.

Uses
Chicory is nutritionally important for what it does rather than what it contains. It contains a special class of carbohydrates known as fructans, a group containing inulin (not to be confused with insulin) and oligofructoses. These carbohydrates feed the symbiotic bacteria living in the intestine rather than the human body itself. They allow the healthy bacteria in the colon to produce short chain fatty acids that help prevent colon cancer, but they do not serve as a food source of pathogenic bacteria. The bacterial fermentation of fructans in the intestine changes its chemistry so that the human body absorbs calcium and magnesium much more readily from other foods, so much so that consuming endive and similar vegetables demonstrably builds stronger bones. These complex sugars also lower cholesterol and triglycerides.

Precautions
Avoid excessive consumption if you have gallstones.


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 Chili and Cayenne
Also known as- Capsicum annum, Capsicum frutescens, Capsicum spp, Sweet Pepper, African Pepper, Hot Pepper

(Other varieties of cultivars include Paprika, Bird's Eye, African Bird Pepper, and Habanero)

PLEASE NOTE! Cayenne and Chili are the same thing and contrary to popular myth, the difference in their names has nothing to do with either their heat units or origins.

Uses
The burning sensation of hot peppers is a reaction of the central nervous system to capsaicin; unlike horseradish, wasabi, garlic, ginger, and mustard, capsaicin only causes the sensation of damage, not real damage to tissues. This sensation of pain, however, depletes a chemical called substance P, and when substance P is used up, the ongoing tissue damage of arthritis, shingles, cluster headaches, fibromyalgia, or lower back injury does not result in pain.
Eating hot peppers can also deplete pain chemicals in the stomach. Peppers do not actually cause heartburn or ulcers. They merely cause the sensation of pain, depleting substance P, so other conditions cannot cause pain. Eating foods seasoned with cayenne or chile may even protect the stomach against damage by aspirin, ibuprofen, or other NSAID pain relief medications.
Capsaicin creams can also reduce itching in psoriasis.

Precautions
Don't touch your eyes with your hands after you have handled capsaicin cream. Excessive use internally may result in gastro-intestinal upset.


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 Chlorella Powder
Also known as- Chlorella pyrendoidosa, and Yaeyama Chlorella (the type offered by Mountain Rose Herbs)

Uses
No group of people benefits more from chlorella than women with fibromyalgia. A study at the Medical College of Virginia found that taking 10 grams (3 tablespoons) of chlorella a day for two months substantially reduced pain, although it did not eliminate it. Other studies at the same medical school have found that chlorella reduces symptoms of ulcerative colitis and hypertension, health problems frequently occurring in women who have fibromyalgia. In one study, daily supplementation with chlorella was seen to reduce high blood pressure, lower serum cholesterol levels, accelerate wound healing and enhance immune functions.

Precautions
As a precaution, if you use chlorella every day, take a vitamin B capsule at least once a week as some European studies showed that Chlorella may weaken Vitamin B supplies in the body.


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 Cleavers and Powder
Also known as- Galium aparine, clivers, goosegrass. Barweed, Bedstraw, Catchweed, Cleaverwort, Coachweed, Eriffe, Everlasting Friendship, Galium aparine, Goosebill, Gosling Weed, Grip Grass, Hayriffe, Hayruff, Hedge-Burs, Hedgeheriff, Love-Man, Mutton Chops, Robin-Run-in-the-Grass, Scratchweed, Stick-a-Back, Sweethearts.

Uses
Cleavers is a diuretic herb, the "Lasix" (furosemide) of the nineteenth century, used to assist ailing hearts by encouraging urination to reduce the volume of blood to relieve congestive heart failure. Herbalists of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries reported that it dissolved kidney stones; however, neither cleavers nor any other diuretic should be used during an acute attack. Cleavers were also used in washes and cosmetics to remove freckles.

Precautions
None.


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 Cloves
Also known as- Syzygium aromaticum and Eugenia aromaticum,

Uses
Oil of cloves has been pronounced the safest and most effective ingredient in most over the counter toothache remedies. It is also a strong germicide, and has been used for its antiseptic properties to treat wounds and infections. Oil of cloves can relieve nausea and indigestion, and may relieve diarrhea caused by intestinal bacteria.

Precautions
Clove oil and clove preparations are generally considered safe in the United States, though people who are allergic to balsam may also be allergic to cloves. When taken undiluted in large doses, clove oil can cause vomiting, sore throat, seizures, kidney and liver damage, fluid in the lungs and tissue damage. People who have kidney or liver disorders and those with a history of seizures should avoid the use of cloves.


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 Club Moss Herb
Also known as- Lycopodium clavatum, Vegetable Sulphur, Goat's Claw, Stag's Horn, Wolf Claw, Running Pine, and Robin Hood's Hatband

Uses
Once listed in the United States Pharmacopeia, club moss is traditionally used to treat kidney and liver complaints, promote healing in wounds, stop bleeding and help drain tissues of excess fluids. It is a recognized diuretic, and may have analgesic and antiseptic properties. The leaves and stems contain two poisons, lycopodine and clavadine, but the spores are completely non-toxic. Club moss is widely used in homeopathic medicine to treat a wide variety of ailments, but its effectiveness is not established by research. Among the traditional uses are:
- treat irritable bladder
- diuretic to encourage urination
- prevent chafing
- regulate menstruation
- reduce edema
- relieve itching in skin conditions
- treat eczema, erysipelas
- antispasmodic to relieve gastritis, kidney complaints, dysentery

Precautions
Not to be used while pregnant. Not for long term suse.
When used as directed, there are no known side effects or dangers, though severe overdoses can cause gastric distress.


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 Codonopsis Root
Also known as- Codonopsis pilosula, Bastard Ginseng, Bellflower, Bonnet Bellflower, Codonopsis tangshen, Codonopsis tubulosa, Dangshen, Radix Codonopsis.

Uses
Codonopsis has been used for centuries to treat appetite loss, diarrhea, and vomiting. Laboratory studies suggest that codonopsis extracts act by reducing the secretion of pepsin in the stomach, and by slowing the rate at which the stomach passes food to the intestines.
In animal studies, codonopsis can prevent the formation of peptic ulcers induces by stress.
Codonopsis also eases asthma attacks by reducing the production of hormones that cause constriction of the bronchia passages. With the healing properties, this herb is especially useful for asthma or peptic ulcers that are compounded by loss of appetite, diarrhea, or vomiting.
Codonopsis may also be used to assist recovery of cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. A clinical study in China involved 76 cancer patients treated with radiation found that codonopsis teas could delay destruction of healthy cells. Treatment with the herb increased the ability of interleukin-2, an immune-system chemical, to fight colorectal cancer, lymphoma, melanoma, and kidney cancer (renal cell carcinoma). Codonopsis also restrain the immune system in lupus, a condition in which the immune system attacks the DNA found in the bodyÍs own skin cells.

Precautions
No restrictions for use. Be aware that codonopsis is a relatively inexpensive herb that is often substituted for Panax ginseng in herbal tonics labeled as "ginseng."


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 Coltsfoot Herb
Also known as- Tussilago farfara, Horsehoof, Coughwort, Fieldhove, Bullsfoot, Cleats, Clayweed, Tusilago, and AssÍs Foot.

Uses
Coltsfoot is one of the most widely used herbs for the treatment of coughs and other lung complaints, and is the basis for many of the herbal cough preparations sold in Europe. The chemical constituents have expectorant, anti-tussive, anti-spasmodic, demulcent, anti-catarrhal and diuretic properties, making coltsfoot extremely helpful in the case of racking coughs such as those that accompany chest colds, asthma and emphysema. However, the USDA classifies coltsfoot as an herb of "unknown safety", and the presence of minute amounts of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, which have been found to cause liver toxicity and cancer, has led to its banning in West Germany. The amount of these alkaloids is extremely small, though, and the beneficial effects are generally believed to outweigh the miniscule risk.

Precautions
Coltsfoot should not be used by pregnant women, as it may be an abortifacient, and the alkaloids seem to have a particularly harmful effect on the liver of the developing infant. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids present in the plant are potentially toxic in large doses, but have not proven toxic in the doses usually used to treat coughs. Still, it is recommended that coltsfoot tea or syrup not be used for more than 4-6 weeks at a time.


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 Comfrey Leaf Herb
Also known as- Symphytum officinale, Bruisewort, Knitback, Knitbone, Boneset, Slippery Root, Bruisewort, Ass Ear, and Blackwort.

Uses
Research seems to bear out the claims for the healing properties of comfrey leaf. In one major European study, an ointment based on comfrey root proved more effective at relieving both pain and swelling in 142 patients with sprained ankles. In another study with over 300 participants showed that comfrey leaf treatments of varying types (ointments, salves, compresses and other topical applications), were very effective in treating eczema, dermatitis, viral skin infections and ulcers of the lower leg. More recent research in the United States has shown that allantoin, one of comfrey's main constituents, breaks down red blood cells, which could account for its ability to help heal bruises and contusions.
With regards to the warnings that comfrey can cause cancer and liver disease, most herbal practitioners point out that those results were from studies that isolated the pyrrolizidine alkaloids and fed or injected them into animal subjects in doses far higher than any typical usage of comfrey leaf, and that comfrey leaf has been regularly ingested by thousands of people around the world without reported ill effects.

Precautions
Not recommended for internal use. Not to be used while pregnant. Not to be applied to broken or abraided skin.
Comfrey was widely used and recommended until the mid-1980s, when reports began to surface about the possibility of liver damage from the pyrrolizidine alkaloids that some plants contain. In 2001, the FTC and FDA combined to issue an injunction against products containing comfrey that were meant for internal use.
This view has been countered by herbalists, who state that common comfrey, the plant most often used for medicinal purposes, contains only negligible amounts of those alkaloids. In fact, one laboratory study of three different sources of comfrey found no pyrrolizidine in one sample, and only negligible amounts in the other two. Still, many herbalists recommend that comfrey preparations should not be taken internally because of the possibility of liver disease and damage. Comfrey should also not be used by pregnant or nursing women.


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 Coriander Seed
Also known as- Coriandrum sativum, Chinese Parsley, Cilantro, Coriandri Fructus, Dhanyaka, Koriander, Kustumburi.

Uses
Coriander seed is best suited for relief of tension in the upper abdomen, such as flatulence, cramps, and bloating.

Precautions
None.


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 Cornflowers
Also known as- centaurea cyanus, Casse Lunette, BachelorÍs Buttons, Bluebonnet, Blue Bow, Centaury, Cyani, Hurtsickle, and Bluecap.

Uses
Cornflower is still used as an eyewash in some parts of France. The mild astringent and antiseptic qualities make it particularly useful against conjunctivitis and inflammation around the eyes. In addition, cornflower is often added to shampoos or the infusion used as a hair rinse to help treat eczema of the scalp. A douche made of a decoction of cornflower can be used in cases of candida (yeast infections).

Precautions
There are no harmful effects reported or noted in the use of cornflower.


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 Corn Silk
Also known as- Zea mays, Indian Corn, Maidis Stigma, Maize Silk, and Stigma Maydis.

Uses
Corn silk relieves a wide range of conditions characterized by urinary inflammation. It is especially useful in treating inflammation caused by bacterial infection. A complex polysaccharide in the silk activates macrophages (white blood cells) to engulf and dissolve infectious microorganisms. The volatile oils neutralize fungi and yeast.
Corn silk is both diuretic and kaliuretic, that is, it encourages retention of sodium and excretion of potassium. Not everyone benefits from excretion of potassium, but people with chronic fatigue, adrenal burnout, and generally "cold" symptoms may.

Precautions
Do not use corn silk if you also take Lasix (furosemide).


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 (Couch Grass) Dog Grass Root
Also known as- Agropyron repens, couchgrass, quackgrass, quickgrass, twitchgrass, Agropyron firmum, Couch Grass, Cutch, Dog Grass, Dog-grass, Doggrass, Durfa Grass, Elymus repens, Elytrigia repens, Graminis rhizoma, Quitch Grass, Scotch Quelch, Triticum firmum, Triticum repens, Wheat Grass, Witch Grass.

Uses
Dog grass is demulcent, meaning it soothes inflammations of mucosal linings, especially in the urinary tract. It is used in treatment of cystitis, prostatitis, and urethritis, and also to relieve pain of enlarged prostate and kidney stones.

Precautions
Dog grass is toxic to birds. It may also lower blood sugars in people. The August 2005 edition of the Journal of Ethnopharmacology published a study noting a potent blood sugar lowering effect of this herb in rats. Dog grass does not stimulate the release of insulin, but it appears to make cells much more sensitive to insulin, at least in the laboratory. Make sure you monitor your blood sugars if you are diabetic and take this herb.


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This information hasn't been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
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 Cramp Bark and Powder
Also known as- Viburnum opulus, Guelder rose, Black Haw, Cranberry Tree, Dog Rowan Tree, Viburnum, May Elder, King's Crown, and May Rose.

Uses
Cramp bark, as its name suggests, is used to treat cramps and spasms of all types. The bark is is antispasmodic, astringent, and sedative, especially in the uterus. Cramp bark has been traditionally used to relieve menstrual cramps and spasms after childbirth and to prevent miscarriage. The herb is also popularly used in combinations to treat asthma and nervous tension.

Precautions
Cramp bark is essentially nontoxic, although taking large quantities of the fruit or leaf can cause diarrhea. Not recommended while taking blood thinning medications.


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This information hasn't been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
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 Cranberry Powder
Also known as- Vaccinium macrocarpon, American Cranberry, Bogberry, and Bog Cranberry.

Uses
Since a landmark study in the British Medical Journal, even mainstream medicine has come to accept cranberry juice and cranberry powder as an effective way to treat and prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs)„which can be deadly for people who have to use a catheter to pass urine.

Precautions
Adding sugar to cranberry powder cancels out the antibacterial effects of the herb.


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This information hasn't been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
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 Cransebill Root and Powder
Also known as- Geranium maculatum, Geranium robertianum, Wild Geranium, Alum Root, American Cranesbill, Spotted Cranesbill, Old MaidÍs Nightcap, and Crowfoot.

Uses
Cranesbill is used for its tannins, compounds that cause proteins in mucous membranes and other linings of the human body exposed directly to the tea to cross-link to prevent leakage or infection. Its primary use in modern herbal medicine is to treat diarrhea in children without side effects. It is also used in poultices to treat pain from infection or inflammation and to relieve the discomfort of cyclic breast pain. The "tanning" action of cranesbill makes it useful for treating conditions as varied as sore throat, canker sores, ulcers, burns, gingivitis, leukorrhea, hemorrhoids,

Precautions
None reported


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This information hasn't been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
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 Cumin Seed whole organic
Also known as- Cuminum cyminum, Should not be confused with black cumin, the Chinese medicinal herb, or sweet cumin, better known as fennel, or caraway.

Uses
In traditional herbal medicine, cumin is used as a diuretic and to treat stomach upset and flatulence. It stimulates menstruation, and also can be added to gargles to treat laryngitis. Poultices of cumin are used to treat swellings of the breasts or testicles. In Ayurvedic medicine, cumin with ghee is smoked to relieve hiccups.

Precautions
Ground cumin should be kept in an air-tight container. Add to cooking in moderation; the pungency of cumin can overwhelm other flavors in a dish. Be forewarned that cumin stimulates the appetite and may increase lactation in nursing mothers.


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This information hasn't been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
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 Curry Leaf
Also known as- Murraya koenigii, Bergera koenigii, and Chalcas koenigii

Uses
Curry Leaf has been used in Asian countries for anti-nausea, as an analgesic, astringent, anti-dysenteric, antioxidant, to reduce fever, lower blood pressure, hypoglycemic, for improvement of vision, to treat night-blindness, and for regulation of fertility. In Ayurvedic medicine, doctors advise a mixture of Curry Leaf blended with coconut milk and salt for Hepatitis patients, which clears the yellow eyes and purifies the liver.

Please note that the curry leaf does not come from the curry plant and is not responsible for the flavor of curry powder.

Precautions
None known


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This information hasn't been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
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 Damiana Leaf and Powder
Also known as- Turnera diffusa. Turnera aphrodisiaca has the same medicinal properties, whereas Turnera ulmifolia looks the same but has a different chemistry. Damiana aphrodisiaca, Herba de la Pastora, Mexican Damiana, Mizibcoc, Old Woman's Broom, Rosemary, Turnerae diffusae folium, Turnerae diffusae herba, Turnera microphyllia.

Uses
Damiana is a popular aphrodisiac for men. It has also been traditionally used by numerous people for the purpose of enhancing orgasms in women, and for asthma, depression, digestive problems, and menstrual disorders. Two US patents list damiana as an ingredient in a "thermogenic" diet aid designed to increase metabolic rate.

Precautions
Teas of damiana may lower blood sugars, but tinctures do not. Since one of the traditional uses of the herb was to induce abortion, it should be avoided in pregnancy.


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This information hasn't been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
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 Dandelion Leaf
Also known as- Taraxacum officinale, Blowball, Cankerwort, Common Dandelion, Dandelion Herb, Leontodon taracum, Lion's Tooth, Pissenlit, Priest's Crown, Swine Snout, Taraxaci herba, Taraxacum vulgare, Wild Endive.

Uses
Dandelion leaf is a mild chloretic, that is, an agent for stimulating the release of bile from the liver into the gallbladder. The herb is used to support treatment of a variety of liver and gallbladder disorders, especially the incomplete digestion of fats. The release of bile is laxative, and accelerates the breakdown of various steroid hormones, causing an indirect, favorable effect on eczema and other skin conditions.
Dandelion leaf, like dandelion root, also is one of the best herbal diuretics. It stimulates urination but also replaces the potassium lost to the increased volume of urine.

Precautions
Use with caution if you have gallstones.


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This information hasn't been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
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 Devil's Claw Root and Powder
Also known as- Harpagophytum procumbens.

Uses
Devil's claw has been traditionally used to offer slow but sure relief of joint pain caused by both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, and it has also been shown to relieve muscle pain and enhance mobility for people with either arthritis or muscle injuries. Scientists don't know exactly how devil's claw works at this time, other than that it is not a COX-2 inhibitor like Celebrex or Vioxx, and therefore is not potentially injurious to the heart.

Precautions
Don't use devil's claw if you take Coumadin (warfarin) or Plavix. Tell your surgeon you have been taking devil's claw before you have surgery. Safety during pregnancy has not been established. Not recommended for those who suffer from stomach inflammation, ulcers, or digestive disorders.


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This information hasn't been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
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 Devil's Club
Also known as- Olopanax horridum, and Acanthopanax horridum, Alaskan Ginseng, Wild Armored Alaskan Ginseng, Pacific ginseng (Note: DevilÍs club is not a ginseng, and in the U.S. it is now illegal to market it with those names.)

Uses
DevilÍs club has a long history of traditional use among certain indigenous tribes which is being confirmed by modern research. Specifically, the antibacterial and antimicrobial constituents may be helpful in fighting tuberculosis and diabetes. The acetylenes found in the inner bark of devilÍs club are effective against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium, making devilÍs club a promising new possibility for treating a wide variety of conditions.
The plant also is often used as an analgesic in traditional medicine, with the uses ranging from chewing the bark and stems to relieve toothache to soaking the entire body in devilÍs club tea for treatment of arthritis or rheumatism.

Precautions
The berries of devilÍs club are poisonous, and the stems and leaves should not be eaten after the thorns on the plant have hardened. Those diagnosed with diabetes should see their medical practitioners regularly while using devilÍs club, as it may change the way that insulin works in the body.


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This information hasn't been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
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 Dill Weed
Also known as- Anethum graveolens, American Dill, Anethum Sowa, Anethi Herba, Dill Herb, Dill Oil, Dill Weed, Dillweed, Dilly, European Dill, Madhura, Peucedanum Graveolens, Satahva, Sotapa, Sowa.

Uses
Dill both settles the stomach and is mildly antibacterial. The August 2005 edition of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry confirmed the usefulness of dill in stopping growth of various bacteria, yeast, and molds, including:

Precautions
If you are using an Indian cookbook, try making the dish with half as much dill as the recipe calls for, unless the cookbook was written specifically for Western readers. The dill sold in India is a different species that is much less pungent than the dill sold in the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Europe.


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This information hasn't been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
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 Dong Quai Root and Powder
Also known as- Angelica sinensis, Dong Gui, Chinese Angelica, and Dan Gui.

Uses
In herbal medicine, the primary use of dong quai is as a uterine tonic, reducing menstrual pain and reducing disagreeable symptoms of menopause. Dong quai does not stimulate the production of estrogen. The herb is used in tonics for both sexes to relieve pain caused by neuralgia, poor circulation, and arthritis.

Precautions
Avoid when there is diarrhea with flatulence. Not to be used while pregnant or if you are on blood thinning medications.


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This information hasn't been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
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 Dulse Flakes and Powder
Also known as- Rhodymenia palmata, Red Dulse, and Sea Lettuce flakes.

Uses
Dulse is an excellent source of phytochemicals and minerals, and a superior source of iodine.
The complex polysaccharides in the herb make it a gentle alternative to psyllium or senna in the treatment of constipation, and there are anecdotal reports that the daily use of a few flakes of dulse can relieve cyclic mastalgia after two months.

Precautions
Don't overdue, and avoid it entirely if you suffer hyperthyroidism. You only need a few flakes, or as little as a quarter-teaspoon a day, to get your mineral needs, and it is best to get your minerals from a variety of whole food and whole herb sources. Don't use on a daily basis for more than 2 weeks at a time, taking a 2 week break before using again. This will prevent you from overdosing iodine with potential imbalance in thyroid function. For periodic use only and not to be taken for extended periods of time. Not to be used while pregnant.

 

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*DISCLAIMER

This Site is For educational purposes only. This site was created for benefiting and aiding in issues from illness and for anyone who would like to learn about a more natural approach of living. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Always seek advise from a physician or and experienced herbalist before using any herb as they may interact with medicines you are already taking or there may be allergic reactions.